Recruitment Tips, Employer Trends, and Hiring Insights from CareerBuilder

Insights & Trends > Survey Results

A Kennedy wants to work for you? You don’t say…The Top 10 Outrageous Resume Lies

I'm a professional baseball playerI know I’m not the only one who thinks this, so I’m just going to say it: I love seeing people get caught in their own web of lies. Okay, I don’t love love it, but for whatever reason, it’s fascinating to me. It’s like watching a soap opera, only better, because it’s real and involves less Botox. Plus, more often than not, they’ve got it coming to them.

That said, today CareerBuilder.com released a survey about the various lies job seekers include in their resumes – from the mundane to the completely far-fetched. According to the survey of 3,100 hiring managers and 8,700 workers nationwide, nearly half of hiring managers reported they caught a candidate lying on their resume. Of those, 57 percent , understandably, automatically dismissed the applicant; however, that means that (for those of you not familiar with subtraction…) 43 percent still gave the candidates a chance. Does that seem like an extremely high number to anyone else?

Predictably, the survey found that the most common lies candidates told involved embellishing responsibilities and skill sets. Including inaccurate dates of employment or claiming to have certain academic degrees were the next most common lies, followed by companies candidates supposedly worked for and job titles they supposedly had.

It also reported that one in five hiring managers are receiving more resumes this year than last year. Forty-three percent of people surveyed said they spend one minute or less looking at a resume when first reviewing applications, and 14 percent spend less than 30 seconds.

The best part of the survey, though, is the list of the most memorable lies hiring managers came across on resumes:

  1. Claimed to be a member of the Kennedy family
  2. Invented a school that did not exist
  3. Submitted a resume with someone else’s photo inserted into the document
  4. Claimed to be a member of Mensa
  5. Claimed to have worked for the hiring manager before, but never had
  6. Claimed to be the CEO of a company when the candidate was an hourly employee
  7. Listed military experience dating back to before he was born
  8. Included samples of work, which the interviewer actually did
  9. Claimed to be Hispanic when he was 100 percent Caucasian
  10. Claimed to have been a professional baseball player

I think my favorite lies include number one (which still doesn’t indicate any level of expertise or skill in a given area), number three (because why would you submit a photo in the first place?), and number eight (because that totally sounds like something that would happen to me). I also like number two, because I fear that would be something I could actually fall for as a hiring manager (I mean, if you’re a member of the Kennedy family, let’s face it, I’m not going to pay attention to much else).

Seriously, though, these types of stories always strike me as so bizarre because I wonder how a person could be so insane brash as to lie about something that can so easily be disproved. Of course, I hesitate to say, “Do they think they’re not going to get caught?” because clearly, some of these lies must work at some point if people continue to tell them, right? Has it ever happened to you where you found a candidate had lied on a resume only AFTER hiring them? Please, entertain me with share your own experiences.

Mary Lorenz

About Mary Lorenz

Mary is a copywriter for CareerBuilder, specializing in B2B marketing and corporate recruiting best practices and social media. In addition to creating copy for corporate advertising and marketing campaigns, she researches and writes about employee attraction, engagement and retention. Whenever possible, she makes references to pop culture. Sometimes, those references are even relevant. A New Orleans native, Mary now lives in Chicago, right down the street from the best sushi place in the city. It's awesome.
104 comments
Halina Dedaj
Halina Dedaj

I was watching the episode of Ugly Betty where she started a blog.. . I've always wanted to have a blog (that people would actually read!) and I have some great ideas for some but how do i actually start one on the internet?. . Help much appreciated..

Job Center Plus
Job Center Plus

Haha... there are some seriously epic lies in there! I particularly like lie number 7 because of the lack of thinking on the liars part ROFL. But more seriously speaking I think that taking on a liar within your company is definitely a questionable action depending on the actual job but overall I'd also say - NO GO to lying applicants!

Irwin Allen
Irwin Allen

Excellent blog with lots of useful information. Are there any forums that you recommend I join? :-)

MCR
MCR

This has been great entertainment! I loved Paula's comment to the "comma" story! Seriously, though, as an HR professional, I found it all quite interesting and helpful! Thank you!

MCR

MCR
MCR

This has been great entertainment! I loved Paula's comment to the "comma" story! Seriously, though, as an HR professional, I found it all quite interesting and helpful! Thank you!

MCR

Raised Eyebrow
Raised Eyebrow

Actually, I know people who are allergic to sunlight. It is called solar urticaria and can affect people a variety of ways including:
hives, rash, and itching. Unlike sunburn, solar urticaria can take affect only minutes after being exposed to the sun. The sunglasses may have been to protect the candidates eyes from the florescent lighting in your office. Often people with SU have photosensitivity to light as well.

Raised Eyebrow
Raised Eyebrow

Actually, I know people who are allergic to sunlight. It is called solar urticaria and can affect people a variety of ways including:
hives, rash, and itching. Unlike sunburn, solar urticaria can take affect only minutes after being exposed to the sun. The sunglasses may have been to protect the candidates eyes from the florescent lighting in your office. Often people with SU have photosensitivity to light as well.

Gayle
Gayle

Just a note to the ever vigilant HR people:

I have spent 20 years as a medical professional, forced to change careers due to a work injury AND my last two employers actually did close up shop. I was able to reach physicians I worked with during those past 20 years which were willing to vouch for the commitment and excellence I demonstrated during my medical career and my work history.

For the past two years after finishing my training in HR at a accredited college, I have realized that regardless of my new retraining, I will never pass all the hoops that is expected of an HR applicant based upon my injury and the fact that my previous work history is difficult to document.

To apply for an HR position it must be written in stone that anyone that requires a bit more effort to document or check out, they are automatically suspect. I suppose that one must have an immaculate resume with perfect verifiable past work experience. My closest hospital has changed names 6 times during the past 8 years. Is is my fault they move the records somewhere impossible to check?

Stepping up and finding actual physicians willing to take phone calls--PERSONAL calls to verify my work history is a huge thing. How many times has your physician called you personally? But rather than HR see that as an expression of how I was valued within the medical community, an HR department questions whether my contacts are valuable because I offered the private numbers myself.

I never seem to get past one specific question on an interview: "Why would someone with your advanced medical experience be applying for an HR position?" When I am honest and say I had to change careers due to an injury the response is always "Thank you for coming, we will be in touch." I can forget about working at any medical facility because of this because they "unofficially share" information.

I am a hard worker, motivated and educated. Because of a work injury, and a work history which is difficult to document, I never get past the first interview.

At what point do I simply say I have been a stay-at-home Mom and then went to college and now I am ready for a job. Of course at this point that is as much the truth as the truth. I have been unable to get a job for the past three years, so I am a stay-at-home Mom, but it really isn't the full truth is it? Say you give me a job based on that part of the truth because it LOOKS better on a resume but later find out I worked for 20 years prior and didn't disclose it? Would I be fired?

I just want a job. I don't want to exist. I don't want to be on welfare!!! I want to be a valuable part of society. Gimme a break. I loved my career and miss it. This was not my fault.

HR demands honesty yet they dabble with dishonesty daily themselves when people like me call and ask, "Please tell me where my resume went wrong--Please help me with input regarding interviewing skills---What can I do to make myself marketable?" BUT nope. You hide behind the rules you use to your favor. You don't tell the truth. You won't answer the question. You won't return the call.

Ironically I was retrained into a field that is unforgiving, unbend able, and inflexible. Human Resources...is a bizarre irony in action. There is nothing human there.

Gayle
Gayle

Just a note to the ever vigilant HR people:

I have spent 20 years as a medical professional, forced to change careers due to a work injury AND my last two employers actually did close up shop. I was able to reach physicians I worked with during those past 20 years which were willing to vouch for the commitment and excellence I demonstrated during my medical career and my work history.

For the past two years after finishing my training in HR at a accredited college, I have realized that regardless of my new retraining, I will never pass all the hoops that is expected of an HR applicant based upon my injury and the fact that my previous work history is difficult to document.

To apply for an HR position it must be written in stone that anyone that requires a bit more effort to document or check out, they are automatically suspect. I suppose that one must have an immaculate resume with perfect verifiable past work experience. My closest hospital has changed names 6 times during the past 8 years. Is is my fault they move the records somewhere impossible to check?

Stepping up and finding actual physicians willing to take phone calls--PERSONAL calls to verify my work history is a huge thing. How many times has your physician called you personally? But rather than HR see that as an expression of how I was valued within the medical community, an HR department questions whether my contacts are valuable because I offered the private numbers myself.

I never seem to get past one specific question on an interview: "Why would someone with your advanced medical experience be applying for an HR position?" When I am honest and say I had to change careers due to an injury the response is always "Thank you for coming, we will be in touch." I can forget about working at any medical facility because of this because they "unofficially share" information.

I am a hard worker, motivated and educated. Because of a work injury, and a work history which is difficult to document, I never get past the first interview.

At what point do I simply say I have been a stay-at-home Mom and then went to college and now I am ready for a job. Of course at this point that is as much the truth as the truth. I have been unable to get a job for the past three years, so I am a stay-at-home Mom, but it really isn't the full truth is it? Say you give me a job based on that part of the truth because it LOOKS better on a resume but later find out I worked for 20 years prior and didn't disclose it? Would I be fired?

I just want a job. I don't want to exist. I don't want to be on welfare!!! I want to be a valuable part of society. Gimme a break. I loved my career and miss it. This was not my fault.

HR demands honesty yet they dabble with dishonesty daily themselves when people like me call and ask, "Please tell me where my resume went wrong--Please help me with input regarding interviewing skills---What can I do to make myself marketable?" BUT nope. You hide behind the rules you use to your favor. You don't tell the truth. You won't answer the question. You won't return the call.

Ironically I was retrained into a field that is unforgiving, unbend able, and inflexible. Human Resources...is a bizarre irony in action. There is nothing human there.

Dale
Dale

What I want to know is if it's Native Indianian or Eastern Indianian. And then you have to further class whether they are Terre-Hauteans or Munci-ites, because while they are all Hoosiers, they are not all as good at lying. (that's what this is supposed to be about right?)

Charles
Charles

C-I C-I O???
"....I have German, Irish, and Indiana in my blood....."

(to the tune of Old MacDonald)
Jonathan he had a job as a C-I, C-I, O. And on that job he had some stress, C-I, C-I, O.

Really......some Indiana blood? Does that make you Inidanianan? Or is it Indianananananan? Surely that is the "Other" box seen on the Dep of Labor stat sheets right?
You are the reason for HS diploma checks!

Charles
Charles

C-I C-I O???
"....I have German, Irish, and Indiana in my blood....."

(to the tune of Old MacDonald)
Jonathan he had a job as a C-I, C-I, O. And on that job he had some stress, C-I, C-I, O.

Really......some Indiana blood? Does that make you Inidanianan? Or is it Indianananananan? Surely that is the "Other" box seen on the Dep of Labor stat sheets right?
You are the reason for HS diploma checks!

Trace
Trace

Sorry PJ, you have missed your chance to hire a "celeb by proxy". Diana Ross may actually be her aunt. The "original" diva's real name is Diane. lol

Stacey
Stacey

Chele,

Hats off to you for earning your degree! I do plan on transferring my credits to a 4-year school and earning my Bachelors. However, in regards to your comment of how much professionalism you gained while working towards your degree; not everyone takes that knowledge with them. I have worked for people with Masters degrees that had about as much professionalism as a stereotypical sailor and people with a high school diploma that exuded professionalism and class. I think what it truly comes down to is a person's personality, drive and commitment to their company and employees that determines their level of professionalism.

Joe
Joe

Thank you! I was looking for a response to Johnathan. Yours was Perfecto!

gina
gina

I've had truck driver candidateS that have no license...let alone the required CDL and lie about it! ... hello!?

Tracy
Tracy

Hey, I make about 4Ok an hour. I mean, I'm here longer than that, but I don't actually "work" all the time I'm here... I have posted like 6 or 7 things in this list after all. :)

Alan
Alan

Hey Lu... If he claimed to have been making 40k an hour, shouldn't that have tipped someone off right away and precluded any need for a background check to begin with? Haha. I'm sure it was a typo. But wow. That's like $83 mil a year!

Alan
Alan

Hey Lu... If he claimed to have been making 40k an hour, shouldn't that have tipped someone off right away and precluded any need for a background check to begin with? Haha. I'm sure it was a typo. But wow. That's like $83 mil a year!

Tracy
Tracy

Fred, did you see that movie where Wil Smith wore a windbreaker with no shirt to an interview?

Mary
Mary

PJ,

Diana Ross's real name is Diane. She was dubbed Diana by Berry Gordy.

Fred
Fred

Best dressed story: I was hiring for an electricians position, our company does service work for an underground mine. A middle aged gentleman shows up for his interview wearing gray sweat pants, sandals, and a dirty, light windbreaker with his large pot belly hanging out. - Beautiful!!!

Fred
Fred

Best dressed story: I was hiring for an electricians position, our company does service work for an underground mine. A middle aged gentleman shows up for his interview wearing gray sweat pants, sandals, and a dirty, light windbreaker with his large pot belly hanging out. - Beautiful!!!

Fred
Fred

Denny, I think Jonathon meant (a) Indian

Jamie
Jamie

Jonathon - Whoa buddy, how can you begin your rant with such a derogatory statement about women and whites and then expect to be taken seriously? You act like we're sneakily checking into people's background looking to 'get them'. As HR professionals, it's our job to protect the company and hire only the most qualified candidates for the job. These are the people you’re letting into your inner sanctum, giving access to your systems, your products, your customers, and ultimately putting out there to represent you. If someone falsifies their information and lies to get the job, that is a serious mark against their character and puts you and everyone in the company at risk. If you don't have the degree, tell us how your experience makes up for it. Have some integrity, man! I agree, not everyone with a college degree is the brightest crayon in the box, and not every high school grad is stupid or incapable of the work. But I don’t care if the person has multiple PHD’s or a seventh grade education - DISHONESTY IS A NO GO!

Tracy
Tracy

Mike in MN.

We drug test all of our employees after we make a job offer. We sent one fellow to his drug test in the morning and the drug testing clinic said he smelled like he had been drinking before he got there, so they asked him if he had been drinking and he said, "Well, yeah! I don't start work until tomorrow so I had a "40" on the way here to celebrate my new job."

Tracy
Tracy

Mike in MN.

We drug test all of our employees after we make a job offer. We sent one fellow to his drug test in the morning and the drug testing clinic said he smelled like he had been drinking before he got there, so they asked him if he had been drinking and he said, "Well, yeah! I don't start work until tomorrow so I had a "40" on the way here to celebrate my new job."

Tracy
Tracy

Kiley - Just because we share stories of how people have lied to us in interviews doesn't mean we don't care about people. I got into HR because I liked being involved, and making a difference for the company and the employees. HR allows both. The candidates who are honest and qualified and do their jobs deserve the best service I can offer, but a person who tries to lie, cheat, fake and scam his/her way into a job probably will not be the person I want to serve. It's great when professionals who deal with similar situations can exchange stories. We, being confidential about everything, don't get to share our stories very often. Some HR professionals have a hard time making employees believe they can serve and protect both the company and the employees, and that may be why you felt such a conviction to prove that HR cares. Now that you work in HR do you see that it is a fine line? We are all just having fun here and not trying to be better than anyone else. I'm sure butchers get together and talk about vendors that send fatty or less than fresh meat, and nail shop owners talk about people with toe fungus. So I say lighten up, have some fun and when you get a funny lie story to share - come on with it!!

Mike In minnesota
Mike In minnesota

What is really scary is when the applicant tells the truth and that freaks you out.

I hire software developers and I had a candidate show up drunk for a 9:00 AM interview. I got about 5 minutes into the interview when I asked him if he had been drinking. He told me, "Just enough to settle my nerves..." so I asked him if he had a drinking problem and he told me that for sure he didn't have a drinking problem,...however he was really addicted to crystal meth!

So at that point I asked him if he were me would he hire himself? He said yes he would, and that given the company has a substance abuse program to help our employees that he would make a great employee after he cleans up.

All of that came out of his mouth with a straight face. My notes and his resume went into my file I call the "Hall of Shame."

Mike In minnesota
Mike In minnesota

What is really scary is when the applicant tells the truth and that freaks you out.

I hire software developers and I had a candidate show up drunk for a 9:00 AM interview. I got about 5 minutes into the interview when I asked him if he had been drinking. He told me, "Just enough to settle my nerves..." so I asked him if he had a drinking problem and he told me that for sure he didn't have a drinking problem,...however he was really addicted to crystal meth!

So at that point I asked him if he were me would he hire himself? He said yes he would, and that given the company has a substance abuse program to help our employees that he would make a great employee after he cleans up.

All of that came out of his mouth with a straight face. My notes and his resume went into my file I call the "Hall of Shame."

Kiley
Kiley

Wow, These comments reiterate why I became an HR Professional. To break the stereotype that HR is only out to get the employees. Don't any of you have care about your profession or the people you manage? Not all comments posted here are an embarrasment to our proffession, but for goodness sake take pride in what you do & be happy or move on! And if you don't have something, don't lie about fix it.
Make it a great day!

Kiley
Kiley

Wow, These comments reiterate why I became an HR Professional. To break the stereotype that HR is only out to get the employees. Don't any of you have care about your profession or the people you manage? Not all comments posted here are an embarrasment to our proffession, but for goodness sake take pride in what you do & be happy or move on! And if you don't have something, don't lie about fix it.
Make it a great day!

Lu
Lu

Jonathon, your derogatory note that the article you did not like was written by a woman is sexist and just as wrong as a prejudice comment made concerning race. Let's watch out for pot calling kettle.

Also, I do agree that race should have no part in any hiring decision, and nor should sex. Honesty, though, speaks to character. If a person can do the job, then they should represent themselves honestly. I applaud any person working to "feed the family". The ability to do so does not realy on dishonesty, however.

I have had quite a few funny interview stories, but none quite as telling as the candidate we offered a job to who had lied about his previously salary and title. The systems anylist had in fact only been a copy boy at his previous job, and instead of the 40k+ an hour he had clamied he was closer to 11 dollars an hour. It may seem benign enough to you, Jonathon, but this character flaw of dishonesty ran deep. He falsified some documents to try and show proof of the information on his resume. By the time we had sorted through the information, and proved it to be a lie, he had posed as a representative of our company at enterprise and stolen one of their vehicles.

If someone shows you they are dishonest, shame on you for thinking they will ever be anything but.

Lu
Lu

Jonathon, your derogatory note that the article you did not like was written by a woman is sexist and just as wrong as a prejudice comment made concerning race. Let's watch out for pot calling kettle.

Also, I do agree that race should have no part in any hiring decision, and nor should sex. Honesty, though, speaks to character. If a person can do the job, then they should represent themselves honestly. I applaud any person working to "feed the family". The ability to do so does not realy on dishonesty, however.

I have had quite a few funny interview stories, but none quite as telling as the candidate we offered a job to who had lied about his previously salary and title. The systems anylist had in fact only been a copy boy at his previous job, and instead of the 40k+ an hour he had clamied he was closer to 11 dollars an hour. It may seem benign enough to you, Jonathon, but this character flaw of dishonesty ran deep. He falsified some documents to try and show proof of the information on his resume. By the time we had sorted through the information, and proved it to be a lie, he had posed as a representative of our company at enterprise and stolen one of their vehicles.

If someone shows you they are dishonest, shame on you for thinking they will ever be anything but.

Cleo
Cleo

Jonathon,

In this time and age, people who hold the keys to making or breaking someone's career, now seem to be sanctimonious. Everyone makes mistakes. Everyone tells lies. Who can throw the first stone?
The issue is, can you actually justify not promoting someone because they want to identify themselves with a particular race of people? Judging by the comments written above, I guess so…
Education makes a difference. That's for sure. However, I've hired people with less college education but more drive and determination then the more educated person in the office, and guess what? The driven, less educated person still consistently brings more to the table.
I've represented 3 very successful business men that all have high school diplomas; each are listed in Forbes magazine - so, what does that tell you... Regarding the part of your statement that you were part Indiana - I forgive you for that because I knew that you meant Indian.

Keep your head up and out of the four boxes of life that others are stuck in. Stay true to who you are.

Truly,
C

Cleo
Cleo

Jonathon,

In this time and age, people who hold the keys to making or breaking someone's career, now seem to be sanctimonious. Everyone makes mistakes. Everyone tells lies. Who can throw the first stone?
The issue is, can you actually justify not promoting someone because they want to identify themselves with a particular race of people? Judging by the comments written above, I guess so…
Education makes a difference. That's for sure. However, I've hired people with less college education but more drive and determination then the more educated person in the office, and guess what? The driven, less educated person still consistently brings more to the table.
I've represented 3 very successful business men that all have high school diplomas; each are listed in Forbes magazine - so, what does that tell you... Regarding the part of your statement that you were part Indiana - I forgive you for that because I knew that you meant Indian.

Keep your head up and out of the four boxes of life that others are stuck in. Stay true to who you are.

Truly,
C

Linda
Linda

Glad you like ripping on Tony, Tracy.
I am not sure ommitters is a word, maybe
omitters??

Tari
Tari

Recently I had a candidate who claimed to work for 2 years at a law firm. When I phone screened him, I realized the law firm belonged to the father of a previous boyfriend of mine that I dated for 2 years. I told him that I knew the partner well and invited him to come in for an interview. Upon reviewing his application, he pointed out that he'd made a mistake and he hadn't worked there for 2 years, it was 2 months! Needless to say, we didn't hire him. Also, after a little more research, it turns out my ex's father didn't remember the guy (in an office of just a few people).

Tari
Tari

Recently I had a candidate who claimed to work for 2 years at a law firm. When I phone screened him, I realized the law firm belonged to the father of a previous boyfriend of mine that I dated for 2 years. I told him that I knew the partner well and invited him to come in for an interview. Upon reviewing his application, he pointed out that he'd made a mistake and he hadn't worked there for 2 years, it was 2 months! Needless to say, we didn't hire him. Also, after a little more research, it turns out my ex's father didn't remember the guy (in an office of just a few people).

Paula
Paula

I actually was really interested in the lie about being "a comma". I may even use that, in a sideways sort of way. "I left my last position because I was a comma and felt I should be treated as more than mere punctuation. I am seeking a position where I can be recognized for the paragraph I am".

My luck, the interviewer would be intrigued by my haughty self confident air and I'd end up with a very weird boss. (Quite honestly, that might be a good fit!)

Thanks for the afternoon entertainment!

Paula
Paula

I actually was really interested in the lie about being "a comma". I may even use that, in a sideways sort of way. "I left my last position because I was a comma and felt I should be treated as more than mere punctuation. I am seeking a position where I can be recognized for the paragraph I am".

My luck, the interviewer would be intrigued by my haughty self confident air and I'd end up with a very weird boss. (Quite honestly, that might be a good fit!)

Thanks for the afternoon entertainment!

Pam Fisher
Pam Fisher

Too bad she was in a comma, I would have thought it was a coma.

Chele
Chele

Stacey,

I am an HR Director with 13 years of experience and an SPHR. I recently completed my bachelors degree to make me more marketable in a difficult economy. What I didn't realize was just how much that education would change my professionalism. I am 100 times more knowledgable in my field and able to respond to issues better then ever before I had that piece of paper. It does have value over and above general experience.

Chele
Chele

Stacey,

I am an HR Director with 13 years of experience and an SPHR. I recently completed my bachelors degree to make me more marketable in a difficult economy. What I didn't realize was just how much that education would change my professionalism. I am 100 times more knowledgable in my field and able to respond to issues better then ever before I had that piece of paper. It does have value over and above general experience.

Chele
Chele

Jonathan - as the CIO of a company you should have some financial stability. Seek help man! You have A LOT of anger issues!

Chele
Chele

Jonathan - as the CIO of a company you should have some financial stability. Seek help man! You have A LOT of anger issues!

Chele
Chele

"If it’s a private company, you can still ask for financial reports and trade references"

As a recruiter, do you really think you would hire someone asking to see financial reports and trade references?

Chele
Chele

"If it’s a private company, you can still ask for financial reports and trade references"

As a recruiter, do you really think you would hire someone asking to see financial reports and trade references?

Colleen
Colleen

Mary, These are way out there. The most bizarre lie I was ever told was actually told by at least three candidates. I received four application with the exact same resume. This was for a Software QA position while working in Mountain View, CA. The only difference were their names at the top. Will the real candidate please stand. I got a good laugh.

Colleen

Ronda
Ronda

Jim, I thank you for your reply but I should have said previously my ex-friend whom lied about her degree, held a position in an accounting firm that required a degree. She could have taken a job "doing books" with a smaller company that didn't require a degree. Companies who hire people with degrees are looking for people who have completed requirements in their specific field. I understand some companies ask for a higher education when a degree may not be needed.
I recommend people taking a lessor job in their field
while completing their education at night. This would be better then making up a degree and being found out later, which almost always ends in being fired. As an employer who looks at applications, we run a background check.
Not only the education, credit and past employment history. If they have lied, they do not get hired. PERIOD!

Trackbacks

  1. [...] discussed before the lies job seekers tell on their resumes, but what about the true-but-strange details job seekers include? [...]

  2. [...] discussed before the lies job seekers tell on their resumes, but what about the true-but-strange details job seekers include? [...]

  3. [...] you might want to subscribe to the RSS feed for updates on HR topics.We’ve discussed before the lies job seekers tell on their resumes, but what about the true-but-strange details job seekers [...]

  4. [...] Learned: Readers Share Their Own Fake Resume Stories In the comments from a previous post on lies job seekers tell on resumes, many readers shared their own experiences in dealing with false resume information. Here are some [...]

  5. [...] Learned: Readers Share Their Own Fake Resume Stories In the comments from a previous post on lies job seekers tell on resumes, many readers shared their own experiences in dealing with false resume information. Here are some [...]

  6. [...] Learned: Readers Share Their Own Fake Resume Stories In the comments from a previous post on lies job seekers tell on resumes, many readers shared their own experiences in dealing with false resume information. Here are some [...]

  7. [...] same boring résumé to you and a dozen others? And hey, it’s not as if these candidates are lying to you on their résumé; if anything, they’re guilty of revealing too [...]

  8. Trackback says:

    Thank you

    I’m into photography and would like to start selling my work and attracting more clients. My question is how would I go about starting a website where people can buy my photos or contact me about taking photos? I’m looking for a way to maximize my ad…

  9. Trackback says:

    Great

    How do I post to my wordpress blog from my desktop, without 3rd party software?

  10. Trackback says:

    I have some question

    I want to write and I wonder how to start a blog for people on this yahoo community..

  11. Trackback says:

    I have some question

    How do I get traffic to a blog on blogger?

  12. Trackback says:

    Like it

    I recently started a blog, and I was just wondering how people have promoted their blogs online to get more followers so you aren’t just typing to nothing out in the internet?. Oh, and for my blog, I don’t really want my friends to be my followers, u…

  13. Trackback says:

    Good info

    Using Firefox: How do you clear out old stored security informaion like account numbers and such?

  14. Trackback says:

    Maybe…

    Hi there. I was just wondering why its such a big thing these days to have a ridiculous amount of ram in a computer? People tell me that the more Ram you have in your computer the faster your computer will be. I always thought that it was the processor…

Stay Connected

Subscribe