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Employment Branding > Talent Acquisition

When Creating Your 2009 Recruitment Plan, Think Broad

Like most business professionals in Q4, I’m in the throes of finalizing my Marketing budget for 2009. The trick in figuring out how to spend the money I do have is creating the right marketing mix. Some things are easy – we should continue and increase programs that make us money. Some things are more challenging – figuring out the right branding vehicles which are notoriously difficult to measure. Each line item is an important part of my marketing mix.

Believe it or not, I have this conversation all the time with corporate recruiters, CPOs, CMOs, CEOs and line managers. But, we don’t talk in terms of how to best market the company and its products. We speak about the recruiting mix – what is the best way to express the company’s brand and what are the best vehicles to capture the most qualified job seekers. The concept of marketing mix and the concept of recruiting mix are basically the same things.

The first question I ask when discussing the recruiting mix is if the company has an employee referral program. For the money, this is absolutely the first place you should begin the search for new employees. Assuming you have engaged employees, you should put recruiting into their hands. Their friends and acquaintances are most likely as engaged as they are. I’m sure there are exceptions to this, but as a general rule, I think it is a good one to follow. Also, remember that if monetary compensation is the carrot, make sure the stick is sufficiently long for payout, for example don’t payout until the referred employee has been with your firm for at least three months.

Once we have discussed that, we usually turn to other ways to express the employment brand of the company. A plain job description posted in five different places online is not likely to deliver the highest number of applicants. But, postings that express your company’s personality and brand will do much better. Using the internet to target job seekers is another excellent way to fill out your recruiting mix from banner ads to e-mail. Each of these tactics can easily be targeted and then measured for effectiveness.

Events should also be part of the mix. For example, a job fair or career fair in your major market cities may be a great way to create a larger brand presence – especially as we see more and more job seekers turning out for career fairs across the country. What about college? Some of your excellent future employees are hitting the books or cheering on the football team at homecoming right now.

So, as you think through your planning for 2009, think a bit about your recruiting mix. Did last year’s plan work for you? If so, keep some of the most effective pieces and try some new things. Were you unhappy with last year’s recruiting efforts and communication? If so, rip up last year’s plan and start fresh. Regardless you’ll need a mix of activity to truly maximize your efforts and satisfy your company’s hiring needs.

7 comments
Jamie Spurlock
Jamie Spurlock

I wanted to add that in my experience in both HR and Recruiting (10 years total) I do not find cover letters useful at all. I like to see a resume that is easy to read and flows well. I really like to see the dates of employment match up and I want to know what the candidate accomplished. I don't mind candidates listing their basic computer skills, but am more interested in their advanced skills.

Yolanda Wolfson
Yolanda Wolfson

I personally agree that cover letters are useless, after over 20 years in the recruiting and sourcing industry, I no longer look at them, in my opinion they add no value as I have found that most of them are form letters and thus most candidate's do not take the time to customized them for the particular position they are applying for; what I do look for is a good resume that is easy to read, and highlights the individual's accomplishments, not their job description.

I do agree that the basic computer skills do not need to be on the resume such as the MS office suite, with the exception of more advance skills such as SQL, Cognos, ASP, etc.

Yolanda Wolfson
Yolanda Wolfson

I personally agree that cover letters are useless, after over 20 years in the recruiting and sourcing industry, I no longer look at them, in my opinion they add no value as I have found that most of them are form letters and thus most candidate's do not take the time to customized them for the particular position they are applying for; what I do look for is a good resume that is easy to read, and highlights the individual's accomplishments, not their job description.

I do agree that the basic computer skills do not need to be on the resume such as the MS office suite, with the exception of more advance skills such as SQL, Cognos, ASP, etc.

KRenner
KRenner

I found the above post to be interesting. I couldn't disagree more. In 15 yrs recruiting, I find cover letters to be typically useless and rarely compelling. I also think that yes, UNLESS the job is computer-related, the fact that you can use a pc is presumed, after-all, it is taught in elementary school now.

KRenner
KRenner

I found the above post to be interesting. I couldn't disagree more. In 15 yrs recruiting, I find cover letters to be typically useless and rarely compelling. I also think that yes, UNLESS the job is computer-related, the fact that you can use a pc is presumed, after-all, it is taught in elementary school now.

Leslie Johnson
Leslie Johnson

The resumes we received in the last year are mind boggling. Is it taken for granted that everyone has computer skills? To the point that it is no longer necessary to list them on a resume? Is it possible the younger generation actually take that large of a skill that is prevalent in most work places for granted? How about cover letters? We receive 1 to every 20 or so resumes submitted. People should know these are VERY important as the work market shrinks to make them stand out. It will make a difference whether you get called in for an interview or not. I personally throw out the resumes with out either of these and so do a lot of other hiring personnel. I can only hope someone reads this and gets the point.

Leslie Johnson
Leslie Johnson

The resumes we received in the last year are mind boggling. Is it taken for granted that everyone has computer skills? To the point that it is no longer necessary to list them on a resume? Is it possible the younger generation actually take that large of a skill that is prevalent in most work places for granted? How about cover letters? We receive 1 to every 20 or so resumes submitted. People should know these are VERY important as the work market shrinks to make them stand out. It will make a difference whether you get called in for an interview or not. I personally throw out the resumes with out either of these and so do a lot of other hiring personnel. I can only hope someone reads this and gets the point.

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