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Job Seekers Want to Know: What Are Your Deal Breakers?

Care to offer some insight?

Earlier this week, my colleague over at our job seeker blog, The Work Buzz, Kaitlin Madden, told me about an article she’s working on about what constitutes a deal breaker for hiring managers or recruiters.  So I thought I’d help her out by asking for your feedback…

What do you consider a deal breaker…during an interview? On a resume or in a cover letter? During salary negotiations?

That is, what’s the one thing a candidate can do – or, rather, has done – to immediately take him or herself out  of the running for consideration?

Got any stories to share?  Maybe a few words of wisdom? (It could end up working out in your favor…After all, the more we educate job seekers on the behavior that they should avoid – or altogether abolish – the more head- and heartache it’ll save everyone in the end…)

Please give us your thoughts in the comments below!  (Got something to say, but don’t want to leave it as a comment? Feel free to email me your stories instead!)

Mary Lorenz

About Mary Lorenz

Mary is a copywriter for CareerBuilder, specializing in B2B marketing and corporate recruiting best practices and social media. In addition to creating copy for corporate advertising and marketing campaigns, she researches and writes about employee attraction, engagement and retention. Whenever possible, she makes references to pop culture. Sometimes, those references are even relevant. A New Orleans native, Mary now lives in Chicago, right down the street from the best sushi place in the city. It's awesome.
6 comments
Nicholas J. Grippi
Nicholas J. Grippi

Job Breakers.... That question is "giant".
While there are many specific and measurable reasons to pass on an applicant, the ultimate for me is the lie.
I understand, and will often practice the art of amnesty.
When a person is unemployed, it is a stressful ordeal. I want the applicant to sell his or her strengths. I look to hire people. I'll always be fair, square, and legal. But when I catch an applicant on a lie... Game Over! They're just "practice" for the remainder of the interview.
I usually continue the interview and will not reveal the "capture". I tend to then ask very difficult procedural questions with the intention to stump the applicant. I usually preface each "tough" question as being important. The applicant thinks they know now why they are not getting hired. The real reason is the lie. If an applicant lies on the interview, either on the application in in their verbal communication, they will steal from you.

Nicholas J. Grippi
Nicholas J. Grippi

Job Breakers.... That question is "giant".
While there are many specific and measurable reasons to pass on an applicant, the ultimate for me is the lie.
I understand, and will often practice the art of amnesty.
When a person is unemployed, it is a stressful ordeal. I want the applicant to sell his or her strengths. I look to hire people. I'll always be fair, square, and legal. But when I catch an applicant on a lie... Game Over! They're just "practice" for the remainder of the interview.
I usually continue the interview and will not reveal the "capture". I tend to then ask very difficult procedural questions with the intention to stump the applicant. I usually preface each "tough" question as being important. The applicant thinks they know now why they are not getting hired. The real reason is the lie. If an applicant lies on the interview, either on the application in in their verbal communication, they will steal from you.

Josh
Josh

A few of my common no-no's:

1) Bringing up salary in the initial interview (for an otherwise great interview, I'll excuse this if it happens during the Q&A at the end).

2) Speaking about scheduling limitations or prospective reasons to leave the position right off the bat.

3) Acting impolitely or speaking down to any person in our office (receptionists or secretaries included).

4) Telling me that dealing with people is your biggest challenge/weakness or least favorite thing. Very few jobs let you work without other people.

5) Consistently answering questions other than those I asked.

In general, it's often the little things that distinguish a good candidate from a bad candidate, so keeping all of those little things in mind is very important!

Josh
Josh

A few of my common no-no's:

1) Bringing up salary in the initial interview (for an otherwise great interview, I'll excuse this if it happens during the Q&A at the end).

2) Speaking about scheduling limitations or prospective reasons to leave the position right off the bat.

3) Acting impolitely or speaking down to any person in our office (receptionists or secretaries included).

4) Telling me that dealing with people is your biggest challenge/weakness or least favorite thing. Very few jobs let you work without other people.

5) Consistently answering questions other than those I asked.

In general, it's often the little things that distinguish a good candidate from a bad candidate, so keeping all of those little things in mind is very important!

Laurel
Laurel

3 things that have happened in the past week:

1) The candidate told us that he wouldn't be available for an in person interview all next week, but should be back the following Monday. We hadn't even tried to schedule yet.

2) Completely filling a CV page to the point of having no white space for eyes to rest.

3) Putting early 90's style graphics on a resume. I can't take that seriously.

Laurel
Laurel

3 things that have happened in the past week:

1) The candidate told us that he wouldn't be available for an in person interview all next week, but should be back the following Monday. We hadn't even tried to schedule yet.

2) Completely filling a CV page to the point of having no white space for eyes to rest.

3) Putting early 90's style graphics on a resume. I can't take that seriously.

Trackbacks

  1. [...] (or lack thereof) issues. Speaking of candidate issues, you shared with us some of your biggest candidate deal-breakers, and we also learned why some unusual candidate tactics may actually be a smart [...]

  2. [...] (or lack thereof) issues. Speaking of candidate issues, you shared with us some of your biggest candidate deal-breakers, and we also learned why some unusual candidate tactics may actually be a smart [...]

  3. [...] (or lack thereof) issues. Speaking of candidate issues, you shared with us some of your biggest candidate deal-breakers, and we also learned why some unusual candidate tactics may actually be a smart [...]

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