Recruitment Tips, Employer Trends, and Hiring Insights from CareerBuilder

Survey Results

What’s on Your Seasonal Hiring Wish List?

What specific traits do you look for in seasonal workers?

For 31 percent of employers who are hiring seasonal workers this year, great customer service skills top the list of most wanted skills in a seasonal worker they’d be interested in hiring full-time.

For its most recent survey, CareerBuilder asked more than 2,400 hiring managers about their seasonal hiring plans this year. According to the survey of over 2,400 employers nationwise, of those employers who are hiring seasonal workers in the fourth quarter of this year, 40 percent are likely to hire them as full-time, permanent basis.

Industry and Compensation Breakdown
Unsurprisingly, the top five industries where seasonal workers will be most in demand this season are retail; customer service; administrative/clerical support; shipping and delivery; and hospitality.  As for pay plans, while some hiring managers (13 percent) reported plans to increase pay for seasonal workers compared to the same period last year, 14 percent are planning a decrease.

  • 48 percent of hiring managers plan to pay seasonal workers $10 or more per hour
  • 9 percent plan to pay $16 or more per hour
  • 32 percent plan to pay between $8 and $9 per hour
  • 19 percent plan to pay between $6 and $7 per hour

Planning to hire seasonal workers? Check out these tips from an earlier post on hiring seasonal workers. (Or read the full post: ‘Tis the Season: 7 Tips for Hiring Seasonal Workers)

  1. Start recruiting for seasonal positions now to get first dibs on top seasonal talent.
  2. Implement screening questions in your application process to weed out some of the unqualified applicants and cut through some of the resume clutter.  
  3. Make personality a priority when interviewing. You need employees who can stay calm in stressful situations (like dealing with frantic holiday shoppers and tight deadlines).
  4. Recruit from college campuses. College students – with their flexible schedules and high energy – make ideal candidates for seasonal positions. 
  5. But don’t discount retirees, either. Like college students, retirees have flexible schedules, but they also have years of valuable work and life experience that they can apply to several different positions.
  6. Remember to check references. You may be short on time, but it’s in the best interest of your company to ensure that your candidates have references who can attest to their performance, professionalism and character.
  7. Hire for the short term, with the long term in mind. As long as these employees are working for you, they’re representing your company, so treat them just as you would full-time employees.
Mary Lorenz

About Mary Lorenz

Mary is a copywriter for CareerBuilder, specializing in B2B marketing and corporate recruiting best practices and social media. In addition to creating copy for corporate advertising and marketing campaigns, she researches and writes about employee attraction, engagement and retention. Whenever possible, she makes references to pop culture. Sometimes, those references are even relevant. A New Orleans native, Mary now lives in Chicago, right down the street from the best sushi place in the city. It's awesome.
8 comments
Chris
Chris

Thanks Mary!

I appreciate the feed back and I'll definitely refine my interview questions to include behavioral questions and I'll put some more emphasis on each applicants references. Hopefully this will ease those seasonal employee problems that always seem to come up during the busiest days.

Chris
Chris

Thanks Mary!

I appreciate the feed back and I'll definitely refine my interview questions to include behavioral questions and I'll put some more emphasis on each applicants references. Hopefully this will ease those seasonal employee problems that always seem to come up during the busiest days.

Chris
Chris

Thanks Mary! I appreciate the feed back and I'll definitely refine my interview questions to include behavioral questions and I'll put some more emphasis on each applicants references. Hopefully this will ease those seasonal employee problems that always seem to come up during the busiest days.

Chris
Chris

I'm hoping to find some seasonal employees that don't do a 180 from the interview to their actually work habits. What kind of things can you suggest that will help call out those who seem to have a strong, committed work ethic and are excited in the interview but end up being one of the worst seasonal hires?

Chris
Chris

I'm hoping to find some seasonal employees that don't do a 180 from the interview to their actually work habits. What kind of things can you suggest that will help call out those who seem to have a strong, committed work ethic and are excited in the interview but end up being one of the worst seasonal hires?

Mary Lorenz
Mary Lorenz

That's a great question, Chris - and one that I'm sure a lot of seasonal employers have.

First, I'd suggest asking behavioral interview questions - which indicate how candidates will act in certain situations based on their past behaviors, which can illicit a more accurate (and honest) response than questions focused on how a candidate thinks he or she would act (or what the candidate thinks you want to hear). Second, ask for a list of references - either to bring with them when they come in for the interview, or along with their resume and cover letter as part of the application process. If the candidate refuses...well, that should be a red flag. You may also want to read my previous post on tips for hiring seasonal workers: http://thehiringsite.careerbuilder.com/2010/09/07/7-steps-for-making-seasonal-hires/

I hope all of this helps!

Mary Lorenz
Mary Lorenz

That's a great question, Chris - and one that I'm sure a lot of seasonal employers have.

First, I'd suggest asking behavioral interview questions - which indicate how candidates will act in certain situations based on their past behaviors, which can illicit a more accurate (and honest) response than questions focused on how a candidate thinks he or she would act (or what the candidate thinks you want to hear). Second, ask for a list of references - either to bring with them when they come in for the interview, or along with their resume and cover letter as part of the application process. If the candidate refuses...well, that should be a red flag. You may also want to read my previous post on tips for hiring seasonal workers: http://thehiringsite.careerbuilder.com/2010/09/07/7-steps-for-making-seasonal-hires/

I hope all of this helps!

Mary Lorenz
Mary Lorenz

That's a great question, Chris - and one that I'm sure a lot of seasonal employers have. First, I'd suggest asking behavioral interview questions - which indicate how candidates will act in certain situations based on their past behaviors, which can illicit a more accurate (and honest) response than questions focused on how a candidate thinks he or she would act (or what the candidate thinks you want to hear). Second, ask for a list of references - either to bring with them when they come in for the interview, or along with their resume and cover letter as part of the application process. If the candidate refuses...well, that should be a red flag. You may also want to read my previous post on tips for hiring seasonal workers: http://thehiringsite.careerbuilder.com/2010/09/07/7-steps-for-making-seasonal-hires/ I hope all of this helps!

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