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Survey: What Employers Get Right – and Wrong – About Social Media

New surveys released through three of CareerBuilder’s niche sites – MiracleWorkers (which caters to healthcare workers), WorkinRetail (serving the retail industry) and Sologig (focused on contract and freelance positions) – reveal the information workers value most on an organization’s social media pages – and what social media moves they despise.

More than 500 workers nationwide in each of the above industries participated. Take a look at the results, and use them to inform your own social media recruitment efforts:

Healthcare

Fifty-three percent of healthcare workers who use social media are interested in seeing information on company social media pages, according to the survey from MiracleWorkers.com.

What healthcare employers should post…

  • Job listings on company pages (wanted by 40 percent of healthcare workers)
  • Fact sheets or Q&A about the company (26 percent)
  • Career paths within the organization (26 percent)
  • Employee testimonials (22 percent)
  • Something that conveys fun about working for the organization (19 percent)

…and what they should avoid:

  • Company communication reads like an ad (a peeve for 35 percent of healthcare workers)
  • Failure to respond to submitted questions (33 percent)
  • Failure to regularly post information on social media or blog entries (23 percent)
  • Filtering or removing social media comments (20 percent)

Retail

Fifty percent of retail workers who use social media are interested in seeing information on company social media pages, according to the survey from WorkInRetail.com.

What retail employers should post…

  • Job listings on company pages (wanted by 33 percent of retail workers)
  • Facts sheets or Q&A about the company (27 percent)
  • Career paths within the organization (27 percent)
  • Employee testimonials (18 percent)
  • Something that conveys fun about working for the organization (18 percent)
  • Pictures of company events (13 percent)
  • Videos of a day on the job (13 percent)
  • Video of new products and services (13 percent)

…and what they should avoid:         

  • Company communication reads like an ad (a peeve for 43 percent of retail workers)
  • Failure to respond to submitted questions (38 percent)
  • Filtering or removing social media comments (27 percent)
  • Failure to regularly post information on social media or blog entries (24 percent)

Information Technology

Fifty-one percent of IT workers who use social media are interested in seeing information on company social media pages, according to a new survey from Sologig.com.

What IT employers should post…

  • Job listings on company pages (wanted by 39 percent of IT workers)
  • Fact sheets or Q&A about the company (32 percent)
  • Career paths within the organization (24 percent)
  • Something that conveys fun about working for the organization (21 percent)
  • Video of new products and services (17 percent)
  • Employee testimonials (16 percent)

…and what they should avoid

  • Company communication reads like an ad (a peeve for 53 percent of healthcare workers)
  • Failure to respond to submitted questions (32 percent)
  • Inconsistency in company messaging in different social media venues (26 percent)
  • Failure to regularly post information or blog entries (25 percent)

Employers must lead the social media path
Despite this interest, very few workers on social media (18 percent of IT workers, 12 percent of healthcare workers, and only 9 percent of retail workers) currently use it as a means to research jobs. Representatives from each site say social media users are waiting for companies to take the lead.

“Social media communication is a two-way street,” says Bill Meidell, product director of WorkinRetail.com. “Retailers need to keep their pages active and respond to as many fans and commenters as possible in order to see a positive return on their efforts.”

“IT workers are not only interested in learning about new career opportunities, but willing to refer jobs to friends or people in their professional networks, as well,” adds Jamie Carney, senior product director of Sologig.com. “Forty-one percent will pass job leads along to others, according to the survey, making social media the perfect vehicle for improving a job listing’s reach.”

Rob Morris, product director of MiracleWorkers.com, echoes this sentiment, saying, “The referral process makes social media a great avenue for career information. We found that 30 percent of healthcare workers on social media pass job opportunities to friends or people in their professional networks.”

Do these results surprise you? What industries are you interested in getting this type of info on?

Mary Lorenz

About Mary Lorenz

Mary is a copywriter for CareerBuilder, specializing in B2B marketing and corporate recruiting best practices and social media. In addition to creating copy for corporate advertising and marketing campaigns, she researches and writes about employee attraction, engagement and retention. Whenever possible, she makes references to pop culture. Sometimes, those references are even relevant. A New Orleans native, Mary now lives in Chicago, right down the street from the best sushi place in the city. It's awesome.
2 comments
Juan
Juan

Information about the job Market:

Network and Netowrk- This is the future for any position

Because of this Interesting statistic: 5 out 1000 job seekers using internet searches are interviewed and are offered employment. Proving that the impersonal touch does not work. It is horrible for the job seekers and for the employers because this process just is not working.

US DOL that said jobs are fou...nd as follows:
48% - friends / relatives; 24% by direct application to the employer; 13% a combination of methods; 6% school placement services; 5% through want-ads; 3% through state employment services; 1% through private employment agencies. This equates to 80% through a combination of networking & targeted applications.

Submitting resumes through an electronic portal system allows quick submittal, but apparently is not working to the job seeker or employers advantage. The resume needs to have exact verbiage as the job description. If the right verbiage is not in the resume the search engines will not pick up the resume and present the job seeker as a possible viable candidate.

Sincerely,

Juan M. Calderon
juan@interfacerehab.com

Juan
Juan

Information about the job Market: Network and Netowrk- This is the future for any position Because of this Interesting statistic: 5 out 1000 job seekers using internet searches are interviewed and are offered employment. Proving that the impersonal touch does not work. It is horrible for the job seekers and for the employers because this process just is not working. US DOL that said jobs are fou...nd as follows: 48% - friends / relatives; 24% by direct application to the employer; 13% a combination of methods; 6% school placement services; 5% through want-ads; 3% through state employment services; 1% through private employment agencies. This equates to 80% through a combination of networking & targeted applications. Submitting resumes through an electronic portal system allows quick submittal, but apparently is not working to the job seeker or employers advantage. The resume needs to have exact verbiage as the job description. If the right verbiage is not in the resume the search engines will not pick up the resume and present the job seeker as a possible viable candidate. Sincerely, Juan M. Calderon juan@interfacerehab.com

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